25 Diverse Books on Health Equity & the Environment.

This month, MAR explores themes of Health Equity and the Environment, both of which are timely topics frequently making news headlines both close to home and farther away. BIPOC communities certainly face a great deal of racism and discrimination in both areas, but how does this apply directly to us moms beyond being currently relevant areas where injustice is experienced? Here are 25 titles ranging from children's board books to Adult non-fiction on Health, the Environment, and Equity that you can add to your library today.


15 of the 25 book covers from the list on a red background


Like many other occurrences in everyday life, I am not put in unsafe situations due to my skin colour, and the heaviness is not lost on me when I consider that being in an unsafe situation due to race in the healthcare system can literally mean the difference between life and death, and that’s not only considering physical health but also mental health.

MAR Recommends: 25 Books on Health, Environment, and Equity.


As a white mother currently raising two white children and pregnant with my third, health equity is something I’ve been considering often lately, particularly in acknowledging the great deal of privilege I possess. My children and I can easily access healthcare knowing that we will not face discrimination based on the colour of our skin. I can be supported through pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period without fear of judgement, assumptions and biases, or receiving care less than an acceptable standard due to my race. Both myself and my unborn child are automatically assured healthier outcomes, less risk, and lowered rates of both fetal and maternal mortality simply because we are white. I can make choices in where and how I birth without worrying others will judge me on the basis of racial discrimination or certain birth traditions in my culture.


Going further and considering how intersectionality comes into play, my privilege only expands when you consider that I speak English as a first language, am cisgender, middle class, married to a white cis man, and both myself and my husband have stable careers. And in the event that I should experience substandard medical care, I can safely report this knowing that it likely was not due to racial prejudice, but perhaps due to a provider not doing their job correctly. When the care I am offered is less than expected, I can brush it off as “they must be having a bad day” or “it’s busy and they are really run off their feet”, rather than fearing that the care I am receiving is due to assumptions the provider is making about me. I can also advocate for myself and speak up when I don’t think I’m receiving the care and attention I deserve, without fear of repercussion or further discrimination due to my race.


Like many other occurrences in everyday life, I am not put in unsafe situations due to my skin colour, and the heaviness is not lost on me when I consider that being in an unsafe situation due to race in the healthcare system can literally mean the difference between life and death, and that’s not only considering physical health but also mental health. As someone who has struggled with anxiety and depression following the births of both of my children, I am exceedingly grateful for the access I had to kind and compassionate care - something that many BIPOC moms definitely do not experience. I certainly won’t pretend that our healthcare system is perfect, particularly when it comes to support for mental health, but it is definitely also important to acknowledge that those who are lucky to be receiving good care are likely not BIPOC individuals.


Considering how racial inequity factors into issues with the environment, I’d argue that this is inextricably tied to health. Because I am white, living in a predominantly white middle-class community, I benefit from clean air, clear drinking water, easy access to affordable healthy food, and exponentially lowered risk of environmental toxicity. I don’t have to worry that my children will encounter harmful toxins in their environment while enjoying parks, playgrounds and exploring the natural world. Boil water advisories are extremely rare, and when they have occurred, it is for a very short period of time, as opposed to being the daily ongoing reality faced by many Indigenous communities in Canada. Simply put, my family is automatically granted good health in many areas due to the privilege we possess and the environment in which we live.


Everyone deserves to reach their full health potential and not be disadvantaged from attaining it because of their race, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, social class, socioeconomic status or other socially determined circumstance. Unfortunately, our systems have been created and sustained in a way that DOES disadvantage Indigenous, Black, and Families of Colour. This month, MAR recommends a wide variety of reading material on the topics of both health and environment, and encourages you to consider how factors of race impact these two areas of everyday life. Hopefully these books can open dialogue in your household around important issues such as safe access to clean drinking water and healthy food, the importance of connections with nature and environment to traditional Indigenous ways of knowing, traditional medicine and healing, and mental health. When reading these books, or others, you can ask yourself:

  • "Is this written from a white-centric point of view?",

  • "Would BIPOC parents experience any barriers to access to follow the recommendations in this book?", and

  • "How is my perception and understanding of this information impacted by my internalized racist biases?".

The offerings this month are varied, including everything from fiction and biographies to even a colouring book on the adult list that we hope may provide a unique activity to do alongside your children as a further way to open conversation.


Happy reading (and colouring)!




Board Books


Happy Healthy Baby Series by Elizabeth Verdick & Marjorie Lisovskis


“The Happy Healthy Baby series features bouncy rhythms and bright photos and illustrations that capture the moments and moods of baby’s day and hold baby’s attention. As the books are shared with them, babies absorb concepts of love, safety, and confidence. These sturdy-format books include tips for parents and caregivers.” - Strong Nations


Nibi is Water by Joanne Robertson


“A first conversation about the importance of Nibi—which means water in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe)—and our role to thank, respect, love, and protect it. Babies and toddlers can follow Nibi as it rains and snows, splashes or rows, drips and sips. Written from an Anishinaabe water protector’s perspective, the book is in dual language—English and Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe).” - Strong Nations